Guangzhou introduces 3D printing to restore remain

A special 3D printer worked next to a display cabinet filled with a variety of imitations of bo

dy parts at a funeral parlour in Guangzhou, capital of southern China’s Guangdong province.

The city’s funeral service center is trying to introduce the new technology to help restore remains damaged in accidents.

“We want the deceased to leave with dignity,” said Yu Jiaqi (pseudonym), an embalming expert at the funeral parlor.

Previously, the restoration was carried out manually, using plasticine, plaster and clay. A facial repair usually took 15 to 30 days.

Yu said not only the long wait but the sometimes barely satisfactory restoration prolonged the pain for family and loved ones.

“The materials can easily deform. We have been looking for better ways to restore the original form of the deceased,” she said.

Li Zhijian, deputy head of the funeral service center, said 3D printing only takes 10 da

ys for a much more lifelike and accurate face, and the texture is stronger and feels more like real skin.

www.dyrbrn.cn

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GiottoPress by Enrique Chavez